• Bogor, Balikpapan push for dialogues on low emission development

    ICLEI- Local Governments for…


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  • Local governments, CSOs, and NGOs discuss strategies for NDC achievement in Indonesia

    Jakarta, Indonesia: Yayasan ICLEI –…


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  • Forests and Landscapes in Indonesia

    By: WRI INDONESIA Data-driven analysis to support government and civil society actions for effective and equitable land-use in Indonesia. This project includes work formerly known as Project POTICO. Indonesia is the world’s fifth largest emitter of greenhouse gases, mainly due to the conversion of its forests and carbon-rich peatlands. These shifts in land use have ecological and social consequences, as Indonesia’s forests are home to thousands of plant and animal species, and 50-60 million Indonesians depend directly on the forests for their livelihoods. Recognizing the domestic and international importance of its tropical landscape and the people in it, the Indonesian government has made encouraging decisions; it has voluntarily committed to a minimum 26% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 and developed a strategy for land use and forestry emissions, extended a moratorium on new clearing of primary forests and peat lands from 2 to 4 years (2013-2015), and increasingly recognized the rights of forest communities and indigenous peoples. Indonesia must balance these environmental and social goals with a rapidly growing economy based on natural resources and corporate interests. The Forests and Landscapes in Indonesia team works with all stakeholders in Indonesia’s forests to support decisions and management that is profitable and sustainable. Our work includes: generating environmental and governance data on natural resource specifically regarding forest lands; making these data available via interactive maps, reports and other tools; interpreting these data in the Indonesia policy context; working with government and civil society to improve forest monitoring; working with industry to enable sustainable expansion of key commodities; conducting capacity building to catalyze change on the ground. Explore our free and easy-to-use interactive tools: The Suitability Mapper enables users to identify potentially suitable sites for sustainable palm oil production in Kalimantan and Papua, Indonesia. The Forest Cover Analyzer enables users to assess forest cover change and risks related to sustainable palm oil production in areas of their choice in Kalimantan, Indonesia. Or learn more about the concept behind our work on palm oil in Indonesia here.


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  • Indonesia plants bamboo to fight climate change

    By: The Jakarta Post   Cultivating bamboo could help Indonesia mitigate the impacts of climate change, an Indonesian environmental scientist said during a side event of the United Nations climate conference in Bonn, Germany. At the event, Arief Rabik, founder of the Bambu Lestari Foundation, said planting bamboo was a very effective way to rehabilitate degraded land and absorb and store carbon dioxide, adding that citizens could reap economic benefits from cultivating the plant. The discussion was held on Tuesday at the Indonesia Pavilion set up by the Indonesian delegation at the UN Climate Change Conference ( COP23 ), which runs from Nov. 6 to 19. One cluster of bamboo could store up to 5,000 liters of waters, demonstrating its role in soil water management. Meanwhile, one hectare of bamboo could absorb up to 50 tons of greenhouse gases per year. Bamboo can also be cultivated in a wide range of soil types, making it easy for locals to manage. "Bamboo is the winner when it comes to rejuvenating degraded land," Arief said as quoted by a statement released by the Environment and Forestry Ministry. Arief, however, said bamboo still had a low economic value compared to other plants. In fact, he said, bamboo could be harnessed to produce products ranging from textile fiber to panels for construction. Arief said his group, with the help of the ministry, was working on a project to cultivate bamboo in 1,000 villages across Indonesia. It is hoped that each village can cultivate at least 70,000 bamboo seeds. Desi Ekawati, a researcher with the ministry's research and innovation development agency, said her team was developing a new bamboo cultivation method to help spur Arief's 1000 bamboo villages project. Called "spartan seedling," Desi said the method could cut the period before harvest from eight or nine months to two or three months. (ahw)


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